How to fix the digital divide

The digital divide in the UK is getting worse, according to a study.

The survey by the Digital Democracy Institute (DDI) found that the proportion of British adults who are online-only fell to 40% last year, down from 59% in 2015.

The decline was driven by two major factors: the decline in online activity, and the rise in smartphone use.

This, the report said, was a “dangerous trend”.

In fact, there was no clear “digital divide” across all age groups in the country.

It was not just younger people who were losing interest in traditional forms of media, as some had hoped.

It is the first time since the survey began in 2000 that the UK has recorded a decline in the proportion who use digital devices in the workplace.

The research also showed that digital-only work was growing more popular, but that it was driven in part by millennials.

This was especially true of those aged 25 to 34, with almost half of them using a smartphone in the previous 12 months.

The report also revealed that the majority of people were using the internet in one form or another, and that there were a lot of people using social media.

The DDI report said that the main cause of the digital gap was that digital devices and platforms did not deliver the same quality of service as they did 10 years ago.

The study found that digital media had “no clear digital divide” in the digital world, with both younger people and older people viewing online media in the same way. “

While some of these platforms may not offer the same level of services as the old days, they still provide a useful tool for those who wish to work remotely,” it said.

The study found that digital media had “no clear digital divide” in the digital world, with both younger people and older people viewing online media in the same way.

The researchers found that, in the past five years, more than a quarter of people aged between 15 and 34 were either online-free or using a digital device.

This is double the percentage of people between the ages of 25 to 44 who were online-alone.

But the study also found that in 2016, the proportion using a social media platform rose by 12 percentage points to 42%.

And more than half of those who were using social networking sites were online in the year before.

The increase in smartphone usage was also significant.

Nearly one in five of those surveyed in 2016 was either online or using an Android smartphone.

It increased by 16 percentage points in the five years before 2015.

A growing proportion of people use Facebook The DPI’s report found that almost half (48%) of the UK’s adults had at least one Facebook profile.

It also found a growing proportion (43%) of adults who were over 55 were online.

The number of people who used Facebook for work grew by 7 percentage points between 2015 and 2016.

This also accounted for a substantial share of the increase seen in the number of adults aged 55 and over (up from 5% in 2016).

“As a result, this is likely to have had an impact on the increase of employment among those aged between 25 and 34. “

“More than half (55%) of those employed at the time of the survey reported being online at the start of the year.” “

But Facebook did not offer everyone access to the platform. “

More than half (55%) of those employed at the time of the survey reported being online at the start of the year.”

But Facebook did not offer everyone access to the platform.

The digital landscape The DGI found that only a small proportion of adults had the same number of online friends as they do now.

For example, more people (23%) were online with friends in 2016 than in 2015, and fewer (16%) had more than one person.

But, as well as offering more choices, social media was also a key part of the job market for many.

The proportion of Australians who were employed online in 2016 fell from 28% in 2020 to 23% in 2017.

The numbers who were not employed online fell from 31% to 27%.

The proportion who were either unemployed or looking for work fell from 12% in 2019 to 9% in 2021.

It means that the DDI found that more than 50% of Australians are not employed in digital media, or that the gap between digital and offline employment is growing.

There is also a rise in people’s likelihood to look for work online.

Around one in four (23% of those in the age group 25-34) said they would be looking for a job online in 2019.

But by 2021, that figure had risen to 41%.

The Ddi’s report also found more people were looking for jobs online in 2017 than they had been 10 years previously.

That was a sign of the growing use of social media, with a rising proportion of those using Facebook as their